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Algebra  | enregistrements trouvés : 56

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This lecture series will be an introduction to stability conditions on derived categories, wall-crossing, and its applications to birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves. I will assume a passing familiarity with derived categories.

- Introduction to stability conditions. I will start with a gentle review of aspects of derived categories. Then an informal introduction to Bridgeland's notion of stability conditions on derived categories [2, 5, 6]. I will then proceed to explain the concept of wall-crossing, both in theory, and in examples [1, 2, 4, 6].

- Wall-crossing and birational geometry. Every moduli space of Bridgeland-stable objects comes equipped with a canonically defined nef line bundle. This systematically explains the connection between wall-crossing and birational geometry of moduli spaces. I will explain and illustrate the underlying construction [7].

- Applications : Moduli spaces of sheaves on $K3$ surfaces. I will explain how one can use the theory explained in the previous talk in order to systematically study the birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves, focussing on $K3$ surfaces [1, 8].
This lecture series will be an introduction to stability conditions on derived categories, wall-crossing, and its applications to birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves. I will assume a passing familiarity with derived categories.

- Introduction to stability conditions. I will start with a gentle review of aspects of derived categories. Then an informal introduction to Bridgeland's notion of stability conditions on derived categories ...

14D20 ; 14E30 ; 14J28 ; 18E30

We will cover some of the more important results from commutative and noncommutative algebra as far as applications to automatic sequences, pattern avoidance, and related areas. Well give an overview of some applications of these areas to the study of automatic and regular sequences and combinatorics on words.

11B85 ; 68Q45 ; 68R15

We give a summary of a joint work with Giovanni Landi (Trieste University) on a non commutative generalization of Henri Cartan's theory of operations, algebraic connections and Weil algebra.

81R10 ; 81R60 ; 16T05

I will present results of three studies, performed in collaboration with M.Benli, L.Bowen, A.Dudko, R.Kravchenko and T.Nagnibeda, concerning the invariant and characteristic random subgroups in some groups of geometric origin, including hyperbolic groups, mapping class groups, groups of intermediate growth and branch groups. The role of totally non free actions will be emphasized. This will be used to explain why branch groups have infinitely many factor representations of type $II_1$. I will present results of three studies, performed in collaboration with M.Benli, L.Bowen, A.Dudko, R.Kravchenko and T.Nagnibeda, concerning the invariant and characteristic random subgroups in some groups of geometric origin, including hyperbolic groups, mapping class groups, groups of intermediate growth and branch groups. The role of totally non free actions will be emphasized. This will be used to explain why branch groups have infinitely ...

20E08 ; 20F65 ; 37B05

In this series of four lectures we develop the necessary background from commutative algebra to study solution sets of algebraic equations in power series rings. A good comprehension of the geometry of such sets should then yield in particular a "geometric" proof of the Artin approximation theorem.
In the first lecture, we review various power series rings (formal, convergent, algebraic), their topology ($m$-adic, resp. inductive limit of Banach spaces), and give a conceptual proof of the Weierstrass division theorem.
Lecture two covers smooth, unramified and étale morphisms between noetherian rings. The relation of these notions with the concepts of submersion, immersion and diffeomorphism from differential geometry is given.
In the third lecture, we investigate ring extensions between the three power series rings and describe the respective flatness properties. This allows us to prove approximation in the linear case.
The last lecture is devoted to the geometry of solution sets in power series spaces. We construct in the case of one $x$-variable an isomorphism of an $m$-adic neighborhood of a solution with the cartesian product of a (singular) scheme of finite type with an (infinite dimensional) smooth space, thus extending the factorization theorem of Grinberg-Kazhdan-Drinfeld.
In this series of four lectures we develop the necessary background from commutative algebra to study solution sets of algebraic equations in power series rings. A good comprehension of the geometry of such sets should then yield in particular a "geometric" proof of the Artin approximation theorem.
In the first lecture, we review various power series rings (formal, convergent, algebraic), their topology ($m$-adic, resp. inductive limit of Banach ...

13J05

An endomorphism of a finitely generated free group naturally descends to an injective endomorphism on the stable quotient. We establish a geometric incarnation of this fact : an expanding irreducible train track map inducing an endomorphism of the fundamental group determines an expanding irreducible train track representative of the injective endomorphism of the stable quotient. As an application, we prove that the property of having fully irreducible monodromy for a splitting of a hyperbolic free-by-cyclic group G depends only on the component of the BNS invariant $\sum \left ( G \right )$ containing the associated homomorphism to the integers. In particular, it follows that if G is the mapping torus of an atoroidal fully irreducible automorphism of a free group and if the union of $\sum \left ( G \right ) $ and $\sum \left ( G \right )$ is connected then for every splitting of $G$ as a (f.g. free)-by-(infinite cyclic) group the monodromy is fully irreducible.
This talk is based on joint work with Spencer Dowdall and Christopher Leininger.
An endomorphism of a finitely generated free group naturally descends to an injective endomorphism on the stable quotient. We establish a geometric incarnation of this fact : an expanding irreducible train track map inducing an endomorphism of the fundamental group determines an expanding irreducible train track representative of the injective endomorphism of the stable quotient. As an application, we prove that the property of having fully ...

20F65 ; 57Mxx ; 37BXX ; 37Dxx

We give a survey on recent advances in Grothendiek's program of anabelian geometry to characterize arithmetic and geometric objects in Galois theoretic terms. Valuation theory plays a key role in these developments, thus confirming its well deserved place in mainstream mathematics.
The talk notes are available in the PDF file at the bottom of the page.

12F10 ; 12J10 ; 12L12

Recently, Armstrong, Reiner and Rhoades associated with any (well generated) complex reflection group two parking spaces, and conjectured their isomorphism. This has to be seen as a generalisation of the bijection between non-crossing and non-nesting partitions, both counted by the Catalan numbers. In this talk, I will review the conjecture and discuss a new approach towards its proof, based on the geometry of the discriminant of a complex reflection group. This is an ongoing joint project with Iain Gordon. Recently, Armstrong, Reiner and Rhoades associated with any (well generated) complex reflection group two parking spaces, and conjectured their isomorphism. This has to be seen as a generalisation of the bijection between non-crossing and non-nesting partitions, both counted by the Catalan numbers. In this talk, I will review the conjecture and discuss a new approach towards its proof, based on the geometry of the discriminant of a complex ...

06B15 ; 05A19 ; 55R80

Rational points on smooth projective curves of genus $g \ge 2$ over number fields are in finite number thanks to a theorem of Faltings from 1983. The same result was known over function fields of positive characteristic since 1966 thanks to a theorem of Samuel. The aim of the talk is to give a bound as uniform as possible on this number for curves defined over such fields. In a first part we will report on a result by Rémond concerning the number field case and on a way to strengthen it assuming a height conjecture. During the second part we will focus on function fields of positive characteristic and describe a new result obtained in a joined work with Pacheco. Rational points on smooth projective curves of genus $g \ge 2$ over number fields are in finite number thanks to a theorem of Faltings from 1983. The same result was known over function fields of positive characteristic since 1966 thanks to a theorem of Samuel. The aim of the talk is to give a bound as uniform as possible on this number for curves defined over such fields. In a first part we will report on a result by Rémond concerning the ...

14G05 ; 11G35

Post-edited  On subgroups of R. Thompson's group $F$
Sapir, Mark (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

We provide two ways to show that the R. Thompson group $F$ has maximal subgroups of infinite index which do not fix any number in the unit interval under the natural action of $F$ on $(0,1)$, thus solving a problem by D. Savchuk. The first way employs Jones' subgroup of the R. Thompson group $F$ and leads to an explicit finitely generated example. The second way employs directed 2-complexes and 2-dimensional analogs of Stallings' core graphs, and gives many implicit examples. We also show that $F$ has a decreasing sequence of finitely generated subgroups $F>H_1>H_2>...$ such that $\cap H_i={1}$ and for every $i$ there exist only finitely many subgroups of $F$ containing $H_i$. We provide two ways to show that the R. Thompson group $F$ has maximal subgroups of infinite index which do not fix any number in the unit interval under the natural action of $F$ on $(0,1)$, thus solving a problem by D. Savchuk. The first way employs Jones' subgroup of the R. Thompson group $F$ and leads to an explicit finitely generated example. The second way employs directed 2-complexes and 2-dimensional analogs of Stallings' core graphs, ...

20F65 ; 20E07 ; 20F05

There are already too many introductory articles on Khovanov homology and certainly another is not needed. On the other hand by now - 15 years after the invention of subject - it is quite easy to get lost after having taken those first few steps. What could be useful is a rough guide to some of the developments over that time and the summer school Quantum Topology at the CIRM in Luminy has provided the ideal opportunity for thinking about what such a guide should look like.
It is quite a risky undertaking because it is all too easy to offend by omission, misrepresentation or other. I have not attempted a complete literature survey and inevitably these notes reflects my personal view, jaundiced as it may often be. My apologies for any offence caused.
I would like to express my warm thanks to Lukas Lewark, Alex Shumakovitch, Liam Watson and Ben Webster.
There are already too many introductory articles on Khovanov homology and certainly another is not needed. On the other hand by now - 15 years after the invention of subject - it is quite easy to get lost after having taken those first few steps. What could be useful is a rough guide to some of the developments over that time and the summer school Quantum Topology at the CIRM in Luminy has provided the ideal opportunity for thinking about what ...

57M25 ; 57M27

Multi angle  Logarithms and deformation quantization
Alekseev, Anton (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

We prove the statement$/$conjecture of M. Kontsevich on the existence of the logarithmic formality morphism $\mathcal{U}^{log}$. This question was open since 1999, and the main obstacle was the presence of $dr/r$ type singularities near the boundary $r = 0$ in the integrals over compactified configuration spaces. The novelty of our approach is the use of local torus actions on configuration spaces of points in the upper half-plane. It gives rise to a version of Stokes' formula for differential forms with singularities at the boundary which implies the formality property of $\mathcal{U}^{log}$. We also show that the logarithmic formality morphism admits a globalization from $\mathbb{R}^{d}$ to an arbitrary smooth manifold. We prove the statement$/$conjecture of M. Kontsevich on the existence of the logarithmic formality morphism $\mathcal{U}^{log}$. This question was open since 1999, and the main obstacle was the presence of $dr/r$ type singularities near the boundary $r = 0$ in the integrals over compactified configuration spaces. The novelty of our approach is the use of local torus actions on configuration spaces of points in the upper half-plane. It gives rise ...

53D55 ; 17B56

définition of the quotient norm - basic properties - existence of minimal liftings: von Neumann algebras - finite dimensional cases - non-uniqueness results - counter-examples: the unitary Fredholm group

This lecture series will be an introduction to stability conditions on derived categories, wall-crossing, and its applications to birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves. I will assume a passing familiarity with derived categories.

- Introduction to stability conditions. I will start with a gentle review of aspects of derived categories. Then an informal introduction to Bridgeland's notion of stability conditions on derived categories [2, 5, 6]. I will then proceed to explain the concept of wall-crossing, both in theory, and in examples [1, 2, 4, 6].

- Wall-crossing and birational geometry. Every moduli space of Bridgeland-stable objects comes equipped with a canonically defined nef line bundle. This systematically explains the connection between wall-crossing and birational geometry of moduli spaces. I will explain and illustrate the underlying construction [7].

- Applications : Moduli spaces of sheaves on $K3$ surfaces. I will explain how one can use the theory explained in the previous talk in order to systematically study the birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves, focussing on $K3$ surfaces [1, 8].
This lecture series will be an introduction to stability conditions on derived categories, wall-crossing, and its applications to birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves. I will assume a passing familiarity with derived categories.

- Introduction to stability conditions. I will start with a gentle review of aspects of derived categories. Then an informal introduction to Bridgeland's notion of stability conditions on derived categories ...

14D20 ; 14E30 ; 14J28 ; 18E30

This lecture series will be an introduction to stability conditions on derived categories, wall-crossing, and its applications to birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves. I will assume a passing familiarity with derived categories.

- Introduction to stability conditions. I will start with a gentle review of aspects of derived categories. Then an informal introduction to Bridgeland's notion of stability conditions on derived categories [2, 5, 6]. I will then proceed to explain the concept of wall-crossing, both in theory, and in examples [1, 2, 4, 6].

- Wall-crossing and birational geometry. Every moduli space of Bridgeland-stable objects comes equipped with a canonically defined nef line bundle. This systematically explains the connection between wall-crossing and birational geometry of moduli spaces. I will explain and illustrate the underlying construction [7].

- Applications : Moduli spaces of sheaves on $K3$ surfaces. I will explain how one can use the theory explained in the previous talk in order to systematically study the birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves, focussing on $K3$ surfaces [1, 8].
This lecture series will be an introduction to stability conditions on derived categories, wall-crossing, and its applications to birational geometry of moduli spaces of sheaves. I will assume a passing familiarity with derived categories.

- Introduction to stability conditions. I will start with a gentle review of aspects of derived categories. Then an informal introduction to Bridgeland's notion of stability conditions on derived categories ...

14D20 ; 14E30 ; 14J28 ; 18E30

Erdös and Rényi introduced a model for studying random graphs of a given "density" and proved that there is a sharp threshold at which lower density random graphs are disconnected and higher density ones are connected. Motivated by ideas in geometric group theory we will explain some new threshold theorems we have discovered for random graphs. We will then explain applications of these results to the geometry of Coxeter groups. Some of this talk will be on joint work with Hagen and Sisto; other parts are joint work with Hagen, Susse, and Falgas-Ravry. Erdös and Rényi introduced a model for studying random graphs of a given "density" and proved that there is a sharp threshold at which lower density random graphs are disconnected and higher density ones are connected. Motivated by ideas in geometric group theory we will explain some new threshold theorems we have discovered for random graphs. We will then explain applications of these results to the geometry of Coxeter groups. Some of this talk ...

05C80 ; 20F65

We begin by introducing to the diagrammatic Cherednik algebras of Webster. We then summarise some recent results (in joint work with Anton Cox and Liron Speyer) concerning the representation theory of these algebras. In particular we generalise Kleshchev-type decomposition numbers, James-Donkin row and column removal phenomena, and the Kazhdan-Lusztig approach to calculating decomposition numbers.

20G43 ; 20F55 ; 20B30

Given a finite-dimensional representation M of a Dynkin quiver Q (which is the orientation of a simply-laced Dynkin diagram) we attach to it the variety of its subrepresentations. This variety is strati ed according to the possible dimension vectors of the subresentations of M. Every piece is called a quiver Grassmannian. Those varieties were introduced by Schofield and Crawley Boevey for the study of general representations of quivers. As pointed out by Ringel, they also appeared previously in works of Auslander.
They reappered in the literature in 2006, when Caldero and Chapoton proved that they can be used to categorify the cluster algebras associated with Q. A special case is when M is generic. In this case all the quiver Grassmannians are smooth and irreducible of "minimal dimension". On the other hand, in collaboration with Markus Reineke and Evgeny Feigin, we showed that interesting varieties appear as quiver Grassmannians associated with non-rigid modules. In this talk I will survey on recent progresses on the subject. In particular I will provide another proof of the key result of Caldero and Chapoton.
Given a finite-dimensional representation M of a Dynkin quiver Q (which is the orientation of a simply-laced Dynkin diagram) we attach to it the variety of its subrepresentations. This variety is strati ed according to the possible dimension vectors of the subresentations of M. Every piece is called a quiver Grassmannian. Those varieties were introduced by Schofield and Crawley Boevey for the study of general ...

Multi angle  Formal conjugacy growth and hyperbolicity
Ciobanu, Laura (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

Rivin conjectured that the conjugacy growth series of a hyperbolic group is rational if and only if the group is virtually cyclic. In this talk I will present the proof (joint with Hermiller, Holt and Rees) that the conjugacy growth series of a virtually cyclic group is rational, and then also confirm the other direction of the conjecture, by showing that the conjugacy growth series of a non-elementary hyperbolic group is transcendental (joint with Antolín). The result for non-elementary hyperbolic groups can be used to prove a formal language version of Rivin's conjecture for any finitely generated acylindrically hyperbolic group G, namely that no set of minimal length conjugacy representatives of G can be regular. Rivin conjectured that the conjugacy growth series of a hyperbolic group is rational if and only if the group is virtually cyclic. In this talk I will present the proof (joint with Hermiller, Holt and Rees) that the conjugacy growth series of a virtually cyclic group is rational, and then also confirm the other direction of the conjecture, by showing that the conjugacy growth series of a non-elementary hyperbolic group is transcendental (joint ...

20F67 ; 68Q45

We introduce the concept of N-differential graded algebras ($N$-dga), and study the moduli space of deformations of the differential of a $N$-dga. We prove that it is controlled by what we call the $N$-Maurer-Cartan equation. We provide geometric examples such as the algebra of differential forms of depth $N$ on an affine manifold, and $N$-flat covariant derivatives. We also consider deformations of the differential of a $q$-differential graded algebra. We prove that it is controlled by a generalized Maurer-Cartan equation. We find explicit formulae for the coefficients involved in that equation. Deformations of the $3$-differential of $3$-differential graded algebras are controlled by the $(3,N)$ Maurer-Cartan equation. We find explicit formulae for the coefficients appearing in that equation, introduce new geometric examples of $N$-differential graded algebras, and use these results to study $N$-Lie algebroids. We study higher depth algebras, and work towards the construction of the concept of $A^N_ \infty$-algebras. We introduce the concept of N-differential graded algebras ($N$-dga), and study the moduli space of deformations of the differential of a $N$-dga. We prove that it is controlled by what we call the $N$-Maurer-Cartan equation. We provide geometric examples such as the algebra of differential forms of depth $N$ on an affine manifold, and $N$-flat covariant derivatives. We also consider deformations of the differential of a $q$-differential graded ...

16E45 ; 53B50 ; 81R10 ; 16S80 ; 58B32

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