F Nous contacter


0

Documents  60G18 | enregistrements trouvés : 5

O
     

-A +A

Sélection courante (0) : Tout sélectionner / Tout déselectionner

P Q

This talk is based on a work jointly with Timothy Budd (Copenhagen), Nicolas Curien (Orsay) and Igor Kortchemski (Ecole Polytechnique).
Consider a self-similar Markov process $X$ on $[0,\infty)$ which converges at infinity a.s. We interpret $X(t)$ as the size of a typical cell at time $t$, and each negative jump as a birth event. More precisely, if ${\Delta}X(s) = -y < 0$, then $s$ is the birth at time of a daughter cell with size $y$ which then evolves independently and according to the same dynamics. In turn, daughter cells give birth to granddaughter cells each time they make a negative jump, and so on.
The genealogical structure of the cell population can be described in terms of a branching random walk, and this gives rise to remarkable martingales. We analyze traces of these mar- tingales in physical time, and point at some applications for self-similar growth-fragmentation processes and for planar random maps.
This talk is based on a work jointly with Timothy Budd (Copenhagen), Nicolas Curien (Orsay) and Igor Kortchemski (Ecole Polytechnique).
Consider a self-similar Markov process $X$ on $[0,\infty)$ which converges at infinity a.s. We interpret $X(t)$ as the size of a typical cell at time $t$, and each negative jump as a birth event. More precisely, if ${\Delta}X(s) = -y < 0$, then $s$ is the birth at time of a daughter cell with size $y$ which then ...

60G51 ; 60G18 ; 60J75 ; 60G44 ; 60G50

Les processus de fragmentation sont des modèles aléatoires pour décrire l'évolution d'objets (particules, masses) sujets à des fragmentations successives au cours du temps. L'étude de tels modèles remonte à Kolmogorov, en 1941, et ils ont depuis fait l'objet de nombreuses recherches. Ceci s'explique à la fois par de multiples motivations (le champs d'applications est vaste : biologie et génétique des populations, formation de planètes, polymérisation, aérosols, industrie minière, informatique, etc.) et par la mise en place de modèles mathématiques riches et liés à d'autres domaines bien développés en Probabilités, comme les marches aléatoires branchantes, les processus de Lévy et les arbres aléatoires. L'objet de ce mini-cours est de présenter les processus de fragmentation auto-similaires, tels qu'introduits par Bertoin au début des années 2000s. Ce sont des processus markoviens, dont la dynamique est caractérisée par une propriété de branchement (différents objets évoluent indépendamment) et une propriété d'auto-similarité (un objet se fragmente à un taux proportionnel à une certaine puissance fixée de sa masse). Nous discuterons la construction de ces processus (qui incluent des modèles avec fragmentations spontanées, plus délicats à construire) et ferons un tour d'horizon de leurs principales propriétés. Les processus de fragmentation sont des modèles aléatoires pour décrire l'évolution d'objets (particules, masses) sujets à des fragmentations successives au cours du temps. L'étude de tels modèles remonte à Kolmogorov, en 1941, et ils ont depuis fait l'objet de nombreuses recherches. Ceci s'explique à la fois par de multiples motivations (le champs d'applications est vaste : biologie et génétique des populations, formation de planètes, ...

60G18 ; 60J25 ; 60J85

Les processus de fragmentation sont des modèles aléatoires pour décrire l'évolution d'objets (particules, masses) sujets à des fragmentations successives au cours du temps. L'étude de tels modèles remonte à Kolmogorov, en 1941, et ils ont depuis fait l'objet de nombreuses recherches. Ceci s'explique à la fois par de multiples motivations (le champs d'applications est vaste : biologie et génétique des populations, formation de planètes, polymérisation, aérosols, industrie minière, informatique, etc.) et par la mise en place de modèles mathématiques riches et liés à d'autres domaines bien développés en Probabilités, comme les marches aléatoires branchantes, les processus de Lévy et les arbres aléatoires. L'objet de ce mini-cours est de présenter les processus de fragmentation auto-similaires, tels qu'introduits par Bertoin au début des années 2000s. Ce sont des processus markoviens, dont la dynamique est caractérisée par une propriété de branchement (différents objets évoluent indépendamment) et une propriété d'auto-similarité (un objet se fragmente à un taux proportionnel à une certaine puissance fixée de sa masse). Nous discuterons la construction de ces processus (qui incluent des modèles avec fragmentations spontanées, plus délicats à construire) et ferons un tour d'horizon de leurs principales propriétés. Les processus de fragmentation sont des modèles aléatoires pour décrire l'évolution d'objets (particules, masses) sujets à des fragmentations successives au cours du temps. L'étude de tels modèles remonte à Kolmogorov, en 1941, et ils ont depuis fait l'objet de nombreuses recherches. Ceci s'explique à la fois par de multiples motivations (le champs d'applications est vaste : biologie et génétique des populations, formation de planètes, ...

60G18 ; 60J25 ; 60J85

Multi angle  Large scale reduction simple
Clausel, Marianne (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

Consider a non-linear function $G(X_t)$ where $X_t$ is a stationary Gaussian sequence with long-range dependence. The usual reduction principle states that the partial sums of $G(X_t)$ behave asymptotically like the partial sums of the first term in the expansion of $G$ in Hermite polynomials. In the context of the wavelet estimation of the long-range dependence parameter, one replaces the partial sums of $G(X_t)$ by the wavelet scalogram, namely the partial sum of squares of the wavelet coefficients. Is there a reduction principle in the wavelet setting, namely is the asymptotic behavior of the scalogram for $G(X_t)$ the same as that for the first term in the expansion of $G$ in Hermite polynomial? The answer is negative in general. This paper provides a minimal growth condition on the scales of the wavelet coefficients which ensures that the reduction principle also holds for the scalogram. The results are applied to testing the hypothesis that the long-range dependence parameter takes a specific value. Joint work with François Roueff and Murad S. Taqqu

Keywords: long-range dependence; long memory; self-similarity; wavelet transform; estimation; hypothesis
testing
Consider a non-linear function $G(X_t)$ where $X_t$ is a stationary Gaussian sequence with long-range dependence. The usual reduction principle states that the partial sums of $G(X_t)$ behave asymptotically like the partial sums of the first term in the expansion of $G$ in Hermite polynomials. In the context of the wavelet estimation of the long-range dependence parameter, one replaces the partial sums of $G(X_t)$ by the wavelet scalogram, ...

42C40 ; 60G18 ; 62M15 ; 60G20 ; 60G22

We start with a brief historical account of wavelets and of the way they shattered some of the preconceptions of the 20th century theory of statistical signal processing that is founded on the Gaussian hypothesis. The advent of wavelets led to the emergence of the concept of sparsity and resulted in important advances in image processing, compression, and the resolution of ill-posed inverse problems, including compressed sensing. In support of this change in paradigm, we introduce an extended class of stochastic processes specified by a generic (non-Gaussian) innovation model or, equivalently, as solutions of linear stochastic differential equations driven by white Lévy noise. Starting from first principles, we prove that the solutions of such equations are either Gaussian or sparse, at the exclusion of any other behavior. Moreover, we show that these processes admit a representation in a matched wavelet basis that is "sparse" and (approximately) decoupled. The proposed model lends itself well to an analytic treatment. It also has a strong predictive power in that it justifies the type of sparsity-promoting reconstruction methods that are currently being deployed in the field.

Keywords: wavelets - fractals - stochastic processes - sparsity - independent component analysis - differential operators - iterative thresholding - infinitely divisible laws - Lévy processes
We start with a brief historical account of wavelets and of the way they shattered some of the preconceptions of the 20th century theory of statistical signal processing that is founded on the Gaussian hypothesis. The advent of wavelets led to the emergence of the concept of sparsity and resulted in important advances in image processing, compression, and the resolution of ill-posed inverse problems, including compressed sensing. In support of ...

42C40 ; 60G20 ; 60G22 ; 60G18 ; 60H40

Nuage de mots clefs ici

Z