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Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and computing, and the potential applications to economics and social sciences are numerous.
In the limit when $n \to +\infty$, a given agent feels the presence of the others through the statistical distribution of the states. Assuming that the perturbations of a single agent's strategy does not influence the statistical states distribution, the latter acts as a parameter in the control problem to be solved by each agent. When the dynamics of the agents are independent stochastic processes, MFGs naturally lead to a coupled system of two partial differential equations (PDEs for short), a forward Fokker-Planck equation and a backward Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation.
The latter system of PDEs has closed form solutions in very few cases only. Therefore, numerical simulation are crucial in order to address applications. The present mini-course will be devoted to numerical methods that can be used to approximate the systems of PDEs.
The numerical schemes that will be presented rely basically on monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian and on a suitable weak formulation of the Fokker-Planck equation.
These schemes have several important features:

- The discrete problem has the same structure as the continous one, so existence, energy estimates, and possibly uniqueness can be obtained with the same kind of arguments

- Monotonicity guarantees the stability of the scheme: it is robust in the deterministic limit

- convergence to classical or weak solutions can be proved

Finally, there are particular cases named variational MFGS in which the system of PDEs can be seen as the optimality conditions of some optimal control problem driven by a PDE. In such cases, augmented Lagrangian methods can be used for solving the discrete nonlinear system. The mini-course will be orgamized as follows

1. Introduction to the system of PDEs and its interpretation. Uniqueness of classical solutions.

2. Monotone finite difference schemes

3. Examples of applications

4. Variational MFG and related algorithms for solving the discrete system of nonlinear equations
Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and ...

49K20 ; 49N70 ; 35K40 ; 35K55 ; 35Q84 ; 65K10 ; 65M06 ; 65M12 ; 91A23 ; 91A15

We explore a direct method allowing to solve numerically inverse type problems for hyperbolic type equations. We first consider the reconstruction of the full solution of the equation posed in $\Omega \times (0, T )$ - $\Omega$ a bounded subset of $\mathbb{R}^N$ - from a partial distributed observation. We employ a least-squares technic and minimize the $L^2$-norm of the distance from the observation to any solution. Taking the hyperbolic equation as the main constraint of the problem, the optimality conditions are reduced to a mixed formulation involving both the state to reconstruct and a Lagrange multiplier. Under usual geometric optic conditions, we show the well-posedness of this mixed formulation (in particular the inf-sup condition) and then introduce a numerical approximation based on space-time finite elements discretization. We show the strong convergence of the approximation and then discussed several examples for $N = 1$ and $N = 2$. The reconstruction of both the state and the source term is also discussed, as well as the boundary case. The parabolic case - more delicate as it requires the use of appropriate weights - will be also addressed. Joint works with Nicolae Cîndea and Diego Araujo de Souza. We explore a direct method allowing to solve numerically inverse type problems for hyperbolic type equations. We first consider the reconstruction of the full solution of the equation posed in $\Omega \times (0, T )$ - $\Omega$ a bounded subset of $\mathbb{R}^N$ - from a partial distributed observation. We employ a least-squares technic and minimize the $L^2$-norm of the distance from the observation to any solution. Taking the hyperbolic ...

35L10 ; 65M12 ; 93B40

The class of commutator-free Magnus integrators is known to provide a favourable alternative to standard interpolatory Magnus integrators, in particular for large-scale applications arising in the time integration of non-autonomous linear evolution equations. A high-order commutator-free Magnus integrator is given by a composition of several exponentials that comprise certain linear combinations of the values of the defining operator at specified nodes. Due to the fact that previously proposed commutator-free Magnus integrators of order five or higher involve negative coefficients in the linear combinations, severe instabilities are observed for spatially semi-discretised partial differential equations of parabolic type or for master equations describing dissipative quantum systems, respectively. In order to remedy this issue, two different approaches for the design of efficient Magnus integrators of orders four, five, and six are pursued: (i) the study of commutator-free Magnus integrators involving complex coefficients with positive real part, and (ii) the study of unconventional Magnus integrators that comprise in addition a single exponential involving a commutator. Numerical experiments for test equations of Schrödinger and parabolic type confirm that the identified novel Magnus integrators are superior to Magnus integrators previously proposed in the literature. The class of commutator-free Magnus integrators is known to provide a favourable alternative to standard interpolatory Magnus integrators, in particular for large-scale applications arising in the time integration of non-autonomous linear evolution equations. A high-order commutator-free Magnus integrator is given by a composition of several exponentials that comprise certain linear combinations of the values of the defining operator at ...

35Q41 ; 65M12

We review Optimized Schwarz waveform relaxation methods which are space-time domain decomposition methods. The main ideas are explained on the heat equation, and extension to advection-diffusion equations are illustrated by numerical results. We present the Schwarz for TrioCFD project, which aims at using this kind of methods for the Stokes equations.

65M55 ; 65M60 ; 65M12 ; 65Y20

Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and computing, and the potential applications to economics and social sciences are numerous.
In the limit when $n \to +\infty$, a given agent feels the presence of the others through the statistical distribution of the states. Assuming that the perturbations of a single agent's strategy does not influence the statistical states distribution, the latter acts as a parameter in the control problem to be solved by each agent. When the dynamics of the agents are independent stochastic processes, MFGs naturally lead to a coupled system of two partial differential equations (PDEs for short), a forward Fokker-Planck equation and a backward Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation.
The latter system of PDEs has closed form solutions in very few cases only. Therefore, numerical simulation are crucial in order to address applications. The present mini-course will be devoted to numerical methods that can be used to approximate the systems of PDEs.
The numerical schemes that will be presented rely basically on monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian and on a suitable weak formulation of the Fokker-Planck equation.
These schemes have several important features:

- The discrete problem has the same structure as the continous one, so existence, energy estimates, and possibly uniqueness can be obtained with the same kind of arguments

- Monotonicity guarantees the stability of the scheme: it is robust in the deterministic limit

- convergence to classical or weak solutions can be proved

Finally, there are particular cases named variational MFGS in which the system of PDEs can be seen as the optimality conditions of some optimal control problem driven by a PDE. In such cases, augmented Lagrangian methods can be used for solving the discrete nonlinear system. The mini-course will be orgamized as follows

1. Introduction to the system of PDEs and its interpretation. Uniqueness of classical solutions.

2. Monotone finite difference schemes

3. Examples of applications

4. Variational MFG and related algorithms for solving the discrete system of nonlinear equations
Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and ...

49K20 ; 49N70 ; 35K40 ; 35K55 ; 35Q84 ; 65K10 ; 65M06 ; 65M12 ; 91A23 ; 91A15

Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and computing, and the potential applications to economics and social sciences are numerous.
In the limit when $n \to +\infty$, a given agent feels the presence of the others through the statistical distribution of the states. Assuming that the perturbations of a single agent's strategy does not influence the statistical states distribution, the latter acts as a parameter in the control problem to be solved by each agent. When the dynamics of the agents are independent stochastic processes, MFGs naturally lead to a coupled system of two partial differential equations (PDEs for short), a forward Fokker-Planck equation and a backward Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation.
The latter system of PDEs has closed form solutions in very few cases only. Therefore, numerical simulation are crucial in order to address applications. The present mini-course will be devoted to numerical methods that can be used to approximate the systems of PDEs.
The numerical schemes that will be presented rely basically on monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian and on a suitable weak formulation of the Fokker-Planck equation.
These schemes have several important features:

- The discrete problem has the same structure as the continous one, so existence, energy estimates, and possibly uniqueness can be obtained with the same kind of arguments

- Monotonicity guarantees the stability of the scheme: it is robust in the deterministic limit

- convergence to classical or weak solutions can be proved

Finally, there are particular cases named variational MFGS in which the system of PDEs can be seen as the optimality conditions of some optimal control problem driven by a PDE. In such cases, augmented Lagrangian methods can be used for solving the discrete nonlinear system. The mini-course will be orgamized as follows

1. Introduction to the system of PDEs and its interpretation. Uniqueness of classical solutions.

2. Monotone finite difference schemes

3. Examples of applications

4. Variational MFG and related algorithms for solving the discrete system of nonlinear equations
Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and ...

49K20 ; 49N70 ; 35K40 ; 35K55 ; 35Q84 ; 65K10 ; 65M06 ; 65M12 ; 91A23 ; 91A15

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