F Nous contacter


0

Documents  92D15 | enregistrements trouvés : 6

O
     

-A +A

Sélection courante (0) : Tout sélectionner / Tout déselectionner

P Q

A popular line of research in evolutionary biology is to use time-calibrated phylogenies in order to infer the underlying diversification process. This involves the use of stochastic models of ultrametric trees, i.e., trees whose tips lie at the same distance from the root. We recast some well-known models of ultrametric trees (infinite regular trees, exchangeable coalescents, coalescent point processes) in the framework of so-called comb metric spaces and give some applications of coalescent point processes to the phylogeny of bird species.

However, these models of diversification assume that species are exchangeable particles, and this always leads to the same (Yule) tree shape in distribution. Here, we propose a non-exchangeable, individual-based, point mutation model of diversification, where interspecific pairwise competition is only felt from the part of individuals belonging to younger species. As the initial (meta)population size grows to infinity, the properly rescaled dynamics of species lineages converge to a one-parameter family of coalescent trees interpolating between the caterpillar tree and the Kingman coalescent.

Keywords: ultrametric tree, inference, phylogenetic tree, phylogeny, birth-death process, population dynamics, evolution
A popular line of research in evolutionary biology is to use time-calibrated phylogenies in order to infer the underlying diversification process. This involves the use of stochastic models of ultrametric trees, i.e., trees whose tips lie at the same distance from the root. We recast some well-known models of ultrametric trees (infinite regular trees, exchangeable coalescents, coalescent point processes) in the framework of so-called comb metric ...

60J80 ; 60J85 ; 92D15 ; 92D25 ; 54E45 ; 54E70

dynamique adaptative - évolution

00A06 ; 92D15

Recent population genomics studies focus prevalently on the aspects of demography and adaptation, whereas age structure (for example, in plants via the maintenance of seed banks) has attracted less attention. Germ banking, that is, seed or egg dormancy, is a prevalent and important life-history trait in plants and invertebrates, which buffers against environmental variability and modulates species extinction in fragmented habitats. I will here summarize our recent findings investigating the intertwined effect of germ banking, time-varying population size and selection on genetic polymorphism in the wild tomato species. First, we examine the effect of seed banking on within species variability and local adaptation in the wild tomato Solanum chilense. Population genetic analyses and statistical inference of past demography was conducted on pooled-sequencing from 30 genes from an exhaustive sampling of 23 populations over Chile and Peru. We reveal a north-south colonization associated with relaxed purifying selection in the south as shown by a decrease of genetic variation and an increasing proportion of nonsynonymous polymorphism from north to south and population substructure with at least four genetic groups. We also uncover 1) a decreasing proportion of adaptive amino acid substitutions from north to south suggesting that adaptation is favoured in large populations, while 2) signatures of local adaptation predominantly occur in the smaller populations from the marginal ranges in the south. These results combined with additional germination data suggest that colonization of new habitats was accompanied by local adaptation for shorter seed banks in the marginal populations, shaping in return the available nucleotide diversity and effectiveness of purifying and positive selection. Second, we use ABC and polymorphism data to estimate population divergence times between two wild tomato species in presence of seed banks. We show that unknown seed banking also impedes our knowledge of the speciation process. Joint work with Katharina B. Böndel, Wolfgang Stephan. Recent population genomics studies focus prevalently on the aspects of demography and adaptation, whereas age structure (for example, in plants via the maintenance of seed banks) has attracted less attention. Germ banking, that is, seed or egg dormancy, is a prevalent and important life-history trait in plants and invertebrates, which buffers against environmental variability and modulates species extinction in fragmented habitats. I will here ...

92D40 ; 92C80 ; 92D15

Pervasive natural selection can strongly influence observed patterns of genetic variation, but these effects remain poorly understood when multiple selected variants segregate in nearby regions of the genome. Classical population genetics fails to account for interference between linked mutations, which grows increasingly severe as the density of selected polymorphisms increases. I will describe a simple limit that emerges when interference is common, in which the fitness effects of individual mutations play a relatively minor role. Instead, similar to models of quantitative genetics, molecular evolution is determined by the variance in fitness within the population, defined over an effectively asexual segment of the genome (a "linkage block"). I will describe how we can exploit this insensitivity in a new "coarse-grained" coalescent framework, which approximates the effects of many weakly selected mutations with a smaller number of strongly selected mutations that create the same variance in fitness. This approximation generates accurate and efficient predictions for silent site variability when interference is common. However, these results suggest that there is reduced power to resolve individual selection pressures when interference is sufficiently widespread, since a broad range of parameters possess nearly identical patterns of silent site variability. Pervasive natural selection can strongly influence observed patterns of genetic variation, but these effects remain poorly understood when multiple selected variants segregate in nearby regions of the genome. Classical population genetics fails to account for interference between linked mutations, which grows increasingly severe as the density of selected polymorphisms increases. I will describe a simple limit that emerges when interference is ...

92D10 ; 92D15

Adaptive dynamics has shaped our understanding of evolution by demonstrating that, via the process of evolutionary branching, ecological interactions can promote diversification. The classical approach to study the adaptive dynamics of a system is to specify the ecological model including all trade-off functions and other functional relationships, and make predictions depending on the parameters of these functions. However, the choice of trade-offs and other functions is often the least well justified element of the model, and examples show that minor variations in these functions can lead to qualitative changes in the model predictions. In the first part of this talk, I shall revisit evolutionary branching and other evolutionary phenomena predicted by adaptive dynamics using an inverse approach: I investigate under which conditions a trade-off function exists that yields a given evolutionary outcome.
Evolutionary branching can amount to the birth of new species, but only if reproductive isolation evolves between the emerging branches. Recent studies show that mating is often assortative with respect to the very trait that is under ecological selection. Such "magic traits" can ensure reproductive isolation, yet they are by far not free tickets to speciation. In the second half of my talk, I discuss the consequences of sexual selection emerging from assortative mating, and show how a perfect female should search for mates.
Adaptive dynamics has shaped our understanding of evolution by demonstrating that, via the process of evolutionary branching, ecological interactions can promote diversification. The classical approach to study the adaptive dynamics of a system is to specify the ecological model including all trade-off functions and other functional relationships, and make predictions depending on the parameters of these functions. However, the choice of ...

92D25 ; 92D15 ; 91A40 ; 91A22

Horizontal transfer of information is recognized as a major process in the evolution and adaptation of population, especially micro-organisms. There is a large literature but the previous models are either based on epidemiological models or population genetics stochastic models with constant population size. We propose a general stochastic eco-evolutionary model of population dynamics with horizontal and vertical transfers, inspired by the transfer of plasmids in bacteria. The transfer rates are either density-dependent (DD) or frequency-dependent (FD) or of Michaelis-Menten form (MM). Our model allows eco-evolutionary feedbacks. In the first part we present a two-traits (alleles or kinds of plasmids, etc.) model with horizontal transfer without mutation and study a large population limit. It's a ODEs system. We show that the phase diagrams are different in the (DD), (FD) and (MM) cases. We interpret the results for the impact of horizontal transfer on the maintenance of polymorphism and the invasion or elimination of pathogens strains. We also propose a diffusive approximation of adaptation with transfer. In a second part, we study the impact of the horizontal transfer on the evolution. We explain why it can drastically affect the evolutionary outcomes. Joint work with S. Billiard,P. Collet, R. Ferrière, C.V. Tran. Horizontal transfer of information is recognized as a major process in the evolution and adaptation of population, especially micro-organisms. There is a large literature but the previous models are either based on epidemiological models or population genetics stochastic models with constant population size. We propose a general stochastic eco-evolutionary model of population dynamics with horizontal and vertical transfers, inspired by the ...

60J75 ; 60J80 ; 92D25 ; 92D15

Nuage de mots clefs ici

Z