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We give a new expression for the law of the eigenvalues of the discrete Anderson model on the finite interval [0, N], in terms of two random processes starting at both ends of the interval. Using this formula, we deduce that the tail of the eigenvectors behaves approximately like exponential of a Brownian motion with a drift. A similar result has recently been shown by B. Rifkind and B. Virag in the critical case, that is, when the random potential is multiplied by a factor 1/ √N.
We give a new expression for the law of the eigenvalues of the discrete Anderson model on the finite interval [0, N], in terms of two random processes starting at both ends of the interval. Using this formula, we deduce that the tail of the eigenvectors behaves approximately like exponential of a Brownian motion with a drift. A similar result has recently been shown by B. Rifkind and B. Virag in the critical case, that is, when the random ...

60B20 ; 65F15

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Given a quantum Hamiltonian, I will explain how the dynamical properties of the underlying classical Hamiltonian affect the behaviour of quantum eigenstates in the semiclassical limit. I will mostly focus on two opposite dynamical paradigms: completely integrable systems and chaotic ones. I will introduce tools from microlocal analysis and show how to use them in order to illustrate the classical-quantum correspondance and to compare properties of completely integrable and chaotic systems.
Given a quantum Hamiltonian, I will explain how the dynamical properties of the underlying classical Hamiltonian affect the behaviour of quantum eigenstates in the semiclassical limit. I will mostly focus on two opposite dynamical paradigms: completely integrable systems and chaotic ones. I will introduce tools from microlocal analysis and show how to use them in order to illustrate the classical-quantum correspondance and to compare properties ...

81Q50 ; 37N20 ; 35P20 ; 58J51 ; 58J50 ; 37D40

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Given a quantum Hamiltonian, I will explain how the dynamical properties of the underlying classical Hamiltonian affect the behaviour of quantum eigenstates in the semiclassical limit. I will mostly focus on two opposite dynamical paradigms: completely integrable systems and chaotic ones. I will introduce tools from microlocal analysis and show how to use them in order to illustrate the classical-quantum correspondance and to compare properties of completely integrable and chaotic systems.
Given a quantum Hamiltonian, I will explain how the dynamical properties of the underlying classical Hamiltonian affect the behaviour of quantum eigenstates in the semiclassical limit. I will mostly focus on two opposite dynamical paradigms: completely integrable systems and chaotic ones. I will introduce tools from microlocal analysis and show how to use them in order to illustrate the classical-quantum correspondance and to compare properties ...

81Q50 ; 37N20 ; 35P20 ; 58J51 ; 58J50 ; 37D40

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The 1983 discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect marks a milestone in condensed matter physics: systems of “ordinary particles at ordinary energies” displayed highly exotic effects, most notably fractional quantum numbers. It was later recognized that this was due to emergent quasi-particles carrying a fraction of the charge of an electron. It was also conjectured that these quasi-particles had fractional statistics, i.e. a behavior interpolating between that of bosons and fermions, the only two types of fundamental particles.
These lectures will be an introduction to the basic physics of the fractional quantum Hall effect, with an emphasis on the challenges to rigorous many-body quantum mechanics emerging thereof. Some progress has been made on some of these, but lots remains to be done, and open problems will be mentioned.

After the lectures a few references regarding the spectrum of the magnetic Schrödinger operator were suggested to me.
See the bibiography below.

Thank Alix Deleporte, Frédéric Faure, Stéphane Nonnenmacher and others for discussions relative to the magnetic Weyl law.
The 1983 discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect marks a milestone in condensed matter physics: systems of “ordinary particles at ordinary energies” displayed highly exotic effects, most notably fractional quantum numbers. It was later recognized that this was due to emergent quasi-particles carrying a fraction of the charge of an electron. It was also conjectured that these quasi-particles had fractional statistics, i.e. a behavior ...

81Sxx ; 81V35 ; 81V70

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