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InterviewsWomen  | enregistrements trouvés : 12

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Post-edited  Interview at CIRM: Sarah Bray
Bray, Sarah (Personne interviewée) | CIRM (Editeur )

Sarah Bray is a PhD student in the Tufts Mathematics Department. She is currently undecided on a specialization topic, although interested in Hyperbolic Geometry and Dynamical Systems. She graduated from Hamilton College in 2011, where she played on the varsity Women’s Lacrosse Team all four years.

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Maria Chudnovsky is a professor in the department of mathematics at Princeton University. She grew up in Russia and Israel, studying at the Technion and received her Ph.D. in 2003 from Princeton under the supervision of Paul Seymour. She moved to Columbia after being a Clay Mathematics Institute research fellow and assistant professor at Princeton. Chudnovsky's contributions to graph theory include the proof of the strong perfect graph theorem with Robertson, Seymour and Thomas characterizing perfect graphs as being exactly the graphs with no odd induced cycles of length at least 5 or their complements. Other research contributions of Chudnovsky include co-authorship of the first polynomial time algorithm for recognizing perfect graphs and of a structural characterization of the claw-free graphs.
Maria Chudnovsky is a professor in the department of mathematics at Princeton University. She grew up in Russia and Israel, studying at the Technion and received her Ph.D. in 2003 from Princeton under the supervision of Paul Seymour. She moved to Columbia after being a Clay Mathematics Institute research fellow and assistant professor at Princeton. Chudnovsky's contributions to graph theory include the proof of the strong perfect graph theorem ...

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Post-edited  Interview at CIRM: Dusa McDuff
McDuff, Dusa (Personne interviewée) | CIRM (Editeur )

Dusa McDuff is the Helen Lyttle Kimmel '42 Professor of Mathematics at Barnard College. At Barnard, she currently teaches "Calculus I", "Perspectives in Mathematics" and courses in geometry and topology.
Professor McDuff gained her early teaching experience at the University of York (U.K.), the University of Warwick (U.K.) and MIT. In 1978, she joined the faculty of the Department of Mathematics at SUNY Stony Brook, where she was awarded the title of Distinguished Professor in 1998.
Professor McDuff has honorary doctorates from the University of Edinburgh, the University of York, the University of Strasbourg and the University of St Andrews. She is a fellow of the Royal Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a member of the American Philosophical Society, and an honorary fellow of Girton College, Cambridge.
She has received the Satter Prize from the American Mathematical Society and the Outstanding Woman Scientist Award from AWIS (Association for Women in Science).
Professor McDuff's service to the mathematical community has been extensive. She is particularly interested in issues connected with the position of women in mathematics, and currently serves on the MSRI Board of Trustees. Together with Dietmar Salamon, she has written several foundational books on symplectic topology as well as many research articles.
Dusa McDuff is the Helen Lyttle Kimmel '42 Professor of Mathematics at Barnard College. At Barnard, she currently teaches "Calculus I", "Perspectives in Mathematics" and courses in geometry and topology.
Professor McDuff gained her early teaching experience at the University of York (U.K.), the University of Warwick (U.K.) and MIT. In 1978, she joined the faculty of the Department of Mathematics at SUNY Stony Brook, where she was awarded the ...

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Post-edited  Interview at CIRM: Sylvia Serfaty
Serfaty, Sylvia (Personne interviewée) | CIRM (Editeur )

Sylvia Serfaty is a Professor at the Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6. Sylvia Serfaty was a Global Distinguished Professor of Mathematics in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. She has been awarded a Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship and a NSF CAREER award (2003), the 2004 European Mathematical Society Prize, 2007 EURYI (European Young Investigator) award, and has been invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians (2006), Plenary speaker at the European Congress of Mathematics (2012) and has recently received the IAMP Henri Poincar´e prize in 2012. Her research is focused on the study of Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations, calculus of variations and mathematical physics, in particular the Ginzburg-Landau superconductivity model. Sylvia Serfaty was the first to make a systematic and impressive asymptotic analysis for the case of large parameters in theory of the Ginzburg-Landau equation. She established precisely, with Etienne Sandier, the values of the first critical fields for nucleation of vortices in superconductors, as well as the leading and next to leading order effective energies that govern the location of these vortices and their arrangement in Abrikosov lattices In micromagnetics, her work with F. Alouges and T. Rivière breaks new ground on singularly perturbed variational problems and provides the first explanation for the internal structure of cross-tie walls.
http://www.ams.org/journals/notices/200409/people.pdf
Personal page : http://www.ann.jussieu.fr/~serfaty/
Sylvia Serfaty is a Professor at the Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6. Sylvia Serfaty was a Global Distinguished Professor of Mathematics in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. She has been awarded a Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship and a NSF CAREER award (2003), the 2004 European Mathematical Society Prize, 2007 EURYI (European Young Investigator) award, and has been invited speaker at ...

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Directrice de recherche CNRS au DMA, UMR 8553 (équipe Analyse)
Directrice Adjoint Scientifique à l'Insmi, en charge de la politique de sites (Institut des Sciences Mathématiques et de leurs Interactions - CNRS)
Adjointe Déléguée Scientifique Référente au CNRS

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Professeur des universités à l’université d’Orléans
Membre du Laboratoire MAPMO
CNRS, Université d'Orléans

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Post-edited  Interview Laure Saint Raymond
Saint-Raymond, Laure (Personne interviewée) | CIRM (Editeur )

Professeur à l’Université Pierre et Marie Curie et au département de Mathématiques et applications de l’ENS
Membre du Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions
Laure Saint-Raymond a donné une conférence lors du premier Congrès de la Société Mathématique sur le thème "Echangeabilité, chaos et dissipation dans les grands systèmes de particules".

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Professeure émérite de Mathématiques Université de Rennes 1
Présidente du "Committe for Women in Mathematics"

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Ingrid Daubechies, James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University.

Baroness Ingrid Daubechies (In 2012 King Albert II of Belgium granted her the title of Baroness) is a Belgian physicist and mathematician. Between 2004 and 2011 she was the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor in the mathematics and applied mathematics departments at Princeton University. She taught at Princeton for 16 years. In January 2011 she moved to Duke University as a professor in mathematics. She was the first woman to be president of the International Mathematical Union (2011-2014). She is best known for her work with wavelets in image compression.

Why she does mathematics, first mathematical memories, first encounter with mathematics, influences, research themes, wavelets theory, collaboration with Alex Grossman and Jean Morlet, first " Eurêka moment ", etc.
Ingrid Daubechies, James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University.

Baroness Ingrid Daubechies (In 2012 King Albert II of Belgium granted her the title of Baroness) is a Belgian physicist and mathematician. Between 2004 and 2011 she was the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor in the mathematics and applied mathematics departments at Princeton University. She taught at Princeton for 16 years. In ...

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Post-edited  Interview at CIRM: Genevieve Walsh
Walsh, Genevieve (Personne interviewée) | CIRM (Editeur )

'I am a geometric topologist, and I'm interested in problems in both geometric topology and geometric group theory. I study groups acting on spaces in a variety of contexts: groups acting on hyperbolic space with quotient the complement of a knot in S3, groups acting on trees, how to make a "good" space for a group to act on, and the many ways a particular group can act on a particular space. I also like to understand the geometry of these spaces.

I was trained (if a mathematician can be trained) as a 3-manifold topologist. Work that came out of my thesis showed that hyperbolic 2-bridge knot complements are virtually fibered. The relevant point is that every 2-bridge knot complement has a finite cover which is very nice geometrically: it is the complement of a link of great circles in S3. I've studied when a 3-manifold has a cover which contains an embedded incompressible surface, by using eigenspaces of covering group action. That every closed hyperbolic 3-manifold has such a cover is known as the virtually Haken conjecture. My current research on knot complements studies the question of commensurability: When do two manifolds or orbifolds have a common finite-sheeted cover? Commensurability is an equivalence relation on manifolds and orbifolds which is very rich even when restricted to knot complements. It tells us a lot about the geometry of the knot complement. For example, the shape of the cusp of a knot complement restricts its commensurability class.

Recently, I've been working on some questions about groups generated by involutions and the type of spaces they can act on. When does a right-angled Coxeter group act by reflections in hyperbolic space? When does the automorphism group of a reflection group act on a CAT(0) space? My approach to these group theoretical questions is deeply influenced by 3-dimensional hyperbolic manifolds and orbifolds. In turn, geometric group theory informs my research on manifolds and orbifolds.'

CIRM - Chaire Jean-Morlet 2018 - Aix-Marseille Université
'I am a geometric topologist, and I'm interested in problems in both geometric topology and geometric group theory. I study groups acting on spaces in a variety of contexts: groups acting on hyperbolic space with quotient the complement of a knot in S3, groups acting on trees, how to make a "good" space for a group to act on, and the many ways a particular group can act on a particular space. I also like to understand the geometry of these ...

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Post-edited  Interview au CIRM : Claire Voisin
Voisin, Claire (Personne interviewée) | CIRM (Editeur )

Claire Voisin, mathématicienne française, est Directrice de recherche au Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) à l'Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu, elle est membre de l'Académie des sciences et titulaire de la nouvelle chaire de mathématiques " géométrie algébrique " au Collège de France. Elle a reçu de nombreux prix nationaux et internationaux pour ses travaux en géométrie algébrique, et en particulier pour la résolution de la conjecture de Koidara sur les variétés de Kälher compactes et celle de la conjecture de Green sur les syzygies. Elle est depuis 2010 membre de l'Académie des sciences. Depuis le 2 juin 2016, elle est titulaire de la nouvelle chaire de mathématique " géométrie algébrique " devenant ainsi la première femme mathématicienne à entrer au Collège de France. Ses recherches portent sur la géométrie algébrique, notamment sur la conjecture de Hodge4, dans la lignée d'Alexandre Grothendieck ; la symétrie miroir et la géométrie complexe kählérienne.

Distinctions :

Médaille de bronze du CNRS (1988) puis médaille d'argent (2006)et médaille d'or (2016)
Prix IBM jeune chercheur (1989)
Prix EMS de la Société mathématique européenne (1992)
Prix Servant décerné par l'Académie des sciences (1996)
Prix Sophie-Germain décerné par l'Académie des sciences (2003)
Prix Ruth Lyttle Satter décerné par l'AMS (2007)
Clay Research Award en 2008
Prix Heinz Hopf (2015)
Officier de l'ordre national de la Légion d'honneur (2016)
Prix Shaw (2017)
Claire Voisin, mathématicienne française, est Directrice de recherche au Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) à l'Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu, elle est membre de l'Académie des sciences et titulaire de la nouvelle chaire de mathématiques " géométrie algébrique " au Collège de France. Elle a reçu de nombreux prix nationaux et internationaux pour ses travaux en géométrie algébrique, et en particulier pour la résolution de ...

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Multi angle  Interview at Cirm: Julia GOG
Gog, julia (Personne interviewée) | CIRM (Editeur )

Professor Julia Gog is a British mathematician, David N. Moore Fellow and Director of Studies in Mathematics at Queens' College, Cambridge and Professor of mathematical biology in the University of Cambridge Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics. She is also a member of the Cambridge Immunology Network and the Cambridge Infectious Diseases Interdisciplinary Research Centre.Her research specialises in using mathematical techniques to study infectious diseases, particularly influenza. Current projects include:

Models of influenza strain dynamics
Spatial spread of influenza
Within-host dynamics of influenza
In vitro dynamics of Salmonella
Bioinformatic methods to detect RNA signals in viruses

http://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/research/dd/
Professor Julia Gog is a British mathematician, David N. Moore Fellow and Director of Studies in Mathematics at Queens' College, Cambridge and Professor of mathematical biology in the University of Cambridge Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics. She is also a member of the Cambridge Immunology Network and the Cambridge Infectious Diseases Interdisciplinary Research Centre.Her research specialises in using mathematical ...

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