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Research schools  | enregistrements trouvés : 337

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Post-edited  Introduction to quantum optics - Lecture 1
Zoller, Peter (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

Quantum optical systems provides one of the best physical settings to engineer quantum many-body systems of atoms and photons, which can be controlled and measured on the level of single quanta. In this course we will provide an introduction to quantum optics from the perspective of control and measurement, and in light of possible applications including quantum computing and quantum communication.
The first part of the course will introduce the basic quantum optical systems and concepts as ’closed’ (i.e. isolated) quantum systems. We start with laser driven two-level atoms, the Jaynes-Cummings model of Cavity Quantum Electro-dynamics, and illustrate with the example of trapped ions control of the quantum motion of atoms via laser light. This will lead us to the model system of an ion trap quantum computer where we employ control ideas to design quantum gates.
In the second part of the course we will consider open quantum optical systems. Here the system of interest is coupled to a bosonic bath or environment (e.g. vacuum modes of the radiation field), providing damping and decoherence. We will develop the theory for the example of a radiatively damped two-level atom, and derive the corresponding master equation, and discuss its solution and physical interpretation. On a more advanced level, and as link to the mathematical literature, we establish briefly the connection to topics like continuous measurement theory (of photon counting), the Quantum Stochastic Schrödinger Equation, and quantum trajectories (here as as time evolution of a radiatively damped atom conditional to observing a given photon count trajectory). As an example of the application of the formalism we discuss quantum state transfer in a quantum optical network.
Parts of this video related to ongoing unpublished research have been cut off.
Quantum optical systems provides one of the best physical settings to engineer quantum many-body systems of atoms and photons, which can be controlled and measured on the level of single quanta. In this course we will provide an introduction to quantum optics from the perspective of control and measurement, and in light of possible applications including quantum computing and quantum communication.
The first part of the course will introduce the ...

81P68 ; 81V80

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Aim of the lecture is to give an introduction to $K3$ surfaces, that are special algebraic surfaces with an extremely rich geometry. The most easy example of such a surface is the Fermat quartic in complex three-dimensional space.
The name $K3$ was given by André Weil in 1958 in honour of the three remarkable mathematicians: Kummer, Kähler and Kodaira and of the beautiful K2 mountain at Cachemire.
The topics of the lecture are the following:

* $K3$ surfaces in the Enriques-Kodaira classification.
* Examples; Kummer surfaces.
* Basic properties of $K3$ surfaces; Torelli theorem and surjectivity of the period map.
* The study of automorphisms on $K3$ surfaces: basic facts, examples.
* Symplectic automorphisms of $K3$ surfaces, classification, moduli spaces.
Aim of the lecture is to give an introduction to $K3$ surfaces, that are special algebraic surfaces with an extremely rich geometry. The most easy example of such a surface is the Fermat quartic in complex three-dimensional space.
The name $K3$ was given by André Weil in 1958 in honour of the three remarkable mathematicians: Kummer, Kähler and Kodaira and of the beautiful K2 mountain at Cachemire.
The topics of the lecture are the following:

* ...

14J10 ; 14J28 ; 14J50 ; 14C20 ; 14C22 ; 14J27 ; 14L30

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In these lectures, we will review what it means for a 3-manifold to have a hyperbolic structure, and give tools to show that a manifold is hyperbolic. We will also discuss how to decompose examples of 3-manifolds, such as knot complements, into simpler pieces. We give conditions that allow us to use these simpler pieces to determine information about the hyperbolic geometry of the original manifold. Most of the tools we present were developed in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, but continue to have modern applications.
In these lectures, we will review what it means for a 3-manifold to have a hyperbolic structure, and give tools to show that a manifold is hyperbolic. We will also discuss how to decompose examples of 3-manifolds, such as knot complements, into simpler pieces. We give conditions that allow us to use these simpler pieces to determine information about the hyperbolic geometry of the original manifold. Most of the tools we present were developed in ...

57M27 ; 57M50 ; 57M25

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This course presents an overview of modern Bayesian strategies for solving imaging inverse problems. We will start by introducing the Bayesian statistical decision theory framework underpinning Bayesian analysis, and then explore efficient numerical methods for performing Bayesian computation in large-scale settings. We will pay special attention to high-dimensional imaging models that are log-concave w.r.t. the unknown image, related to so-called “convex imaging problems”. This will provide an opportunity to establish connections with the convex optimisation and machine learning approaches to imaging, and to discuss some of their relative strengths and drawbacks. Examples of topics covered in the course include: efficient stochastic simulation and optimisation numerical methods that tightly combine proximal convex optimisation with Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques; strategies for estimating unknown model parameters and performing model selection, methods for calculating Bayesian confidence intervals for images and performing uncertainty quantification analyses; and new theory regarding the role of convexity in maximum-a-posteriori and minimum-mean-square-error estimation. The theory, methods, and algorithms are illustrated with a range of mathematical imaging experiments.
This course presents an overview of modern Bayesian strategies for solving imaging inverse problems. We will start by introducing the Bayesian statistical decision theory framework underpinning Bayesian analysis, and then explore efficient numerical methods for performing Bayesian computation in large-scale settings. We will pay special attention to high-dimensional imaging models that are log-concave w.r.t. the unknown image, related to ...

49N45 ; 65C40 ; 65C60 ; 65J22 ; 68U10 ; 62C10 ; 62F15 ; 94A08

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Post-edited  On the boundary control method
Oksanen, Lauri (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

This is a survey talk about the Boundary Control method. The method originates from the work by Belishev in 1987. He developed the method to solve the inverse boundary value problem for the acoustic wave equation with an isotropic sound speed. The method has proven to be very versatile and it has been applied to various inverse problems for hyperbolic partial differential equations. We review recent results based on the method and explain how a geometric version of method works in the case of the wave equation for the Laplace-Beltrami operator on a compact Riemannian manifold with boundary.
This is a survey talk about the Boundary Control method. The method originates from the work by Belishev in 1987. He developed the method to solve the inverse boundary value problem for the acoustic wave equation with an isotropic sound speed. The method has proven to be very versatile and it has been applied to various inverse problems for hyperbolic partial differential equations. We review recent results based on the method and explain how a ...

35R30 ; 35L05 ; 35L20

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Theory of persistence modules is a rapidly developing field lying on the borderline between algebra, geometry and topology. It provides a very useful viewpoint at Morse theory, and at the same time is one of the cornerstones of topological data analysis. In the course I'll review foundations of this theory and focus on its applications to symplectic topology. In parts, the course is based on a recent work with Egor Shelukhin arXiv:1412.8277

37Cxx ; 37Jxx ; 53D25 ; 53D40 ; 53D42

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This school consists of an array of courses which at first glance may seem to have little in common. The underlying structure relating gauge theory to enumerative geometry to number theory is string theory. In this short introduction, we will attempt to give a schematic overview of how the various topics covered in this school fit into this overarching framework.

81T30 ; 83E30

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Post-edited  Coloring graphs on surfaces
Esperet, Louis (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

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Spherical Hecke algebra, Satake transform, and an introduction to local Langlands correspondence.
CIRM - Chaire Jean-Morlet 2016 - Aix-Marseille Université

20C08 ; 22E50 ; 11S37

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We will cover some of the more important results from commutative and noncommutative algebra as far as applications to automatic sequences, pattern avoidance, and related areas. Well give an overview of some applications of these areas to the study of automatic and regular sequences and combinatorics on words.

11B85 ; 68Q45 ; 68R15

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- Normalized characters of the symmetric groups,
- Kerov polynomials and Kerov positivity conjecture,
- Stanley character polynomials and multirectangular coordinates of Young diagrams,
- Stanley character formula and maps,
- Jack characters
- characterization, partial results.

05E10 ; 05E15 ; 20C30 ; 05A15 ; 05C10

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I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, and iceberg model.
I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, and iceberg model.
I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, and iceberg model.
I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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In this series of lectures, we will focus on simple Lie groups, their dense subgroups and the convolution powers of their measures. In particular, we will dicuss the following two questions.
Let G be a Lie group. Is every Borel measurable subgroup of G with maximal Hausdorff dimension equal to the group G?
Is the convolution of sufficiently many compactly supported continuous functions on G always continuously differentiable?
Even though the answer to these questions is no when G is abelian, the answer is yes when G is simple. This is a joint work with N. de Saxce. First, I will explain the history of these two questions and their interaction. Then, I will relate these questions to spectral gap properties. Finally, I will discuss these spectral gap properties.
In this series of lectures, we will focus on simple Lie groups, their dense subgroups and the convolution powers of their measures. In particular, we will dicuss the following two questions.
Let G be a Lie group. Is every Borel measurable subgroup of G with maximal Hausdorff dimension equal to the group G?
Is the convolution of sufficiently many compactly supported continuous functions on G always continuously differentiable?
Even though the ...

22E30 ; 28A78 ; 43A65

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Variational formulas for limit shapes of directed last-passage percolation models. Connections of minimizing cocycles of the variational formulas to geodesics, Busemann functions, and stationary percolation.

60K35 ; 60K37 ; 82C22 ; 82C43 ; 82D60

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Lecture 1. Collective dynamics and self-organization in biological systems : challenges and some examples.

Lecture 2. The Vicsek model as a paradigm for self-organization : from particles to fluid via kinetic descriptions

Lecture 3. Phase transitions in the Vicsek model : mathematical analyses in the kinetic framework.

35L60 ; 82C22 ; 82B26 ; 82C26 ; 92D50

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Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and computing, and the potential applications to economics and social sciences are numerous.
In the limit when $n \to +\infty$, a given agent feels the presence of the others through the statistical distribution of the states. Assuming that the perturbations of a single agent's strategy does not influence the statistical states distribution, the latter acts as a parameter in the control problem to be solved by each agent. When the dynamics of the agents are independent stochastic processes, MFGs naturally lead to a coupled system of two partial differential equations (PDEs for short), a forward Fokker-Planck equation and a backward Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation.
The latter system of PDEs has closed form solutions in very few cases only. Therefore, numerical simulation are crucial in order to address applications. The present mini-course will be devoted to numerical methods that can be used to approximate the systems of PDEs.
The numerical schemes that will be presented rely basically on monotone approximations of the Hamiltonian and on a suitable weak formulation of the Fokker-Planck equation.
These schemes have several important features:

- The discrete problem has the same structure as the continous one, so existence, energy estimates, and possibly uniqueness can be obtained with the same kind of arguments

- Monotonicity guarantees the stability of the scheme: it is robust in the deterministic limit

- convergence to classical or weak solutions can be proved

Finally, there are particular cases named variational MFGS in which the system of PDEs can be seen as the optimality conditions of some optimal control problem driven by a PDE. In such cases, augmented Lagrangian methods can be used for solving the discrete nonlinear system. The mini-course will be orgamized as follows

1. Introduction to the system of PDEs and its interpretation. Uniqueness of classical solutions.

2. Monotone finite difference schemes

3. Examples of applications

4. Variational MFG and related algorithms for solving the discrete system of nonlinear equations
Recently, an important research activity on mean field games (MFGs for short) has been initiated by the pioneering works of Lasry and Lions: it aims at studying the asymptotic behavior of stochastic differential games (Nash equilibria) as the number $n$ of agents tends to infinity. The field is now rapidly growing in several directions, including stochastic optimal control, analysis of PDEs, calculus of variations, numerical analysis and ...

49K20 ; 49N70 ; 35F21 ; 35K40 ; 35K55 ; 35Q84 ; 65K10 ; 65M06 ; 65M12 ; 91A23 ; 91A15

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These lectures introduce the dynamical systems approach to tilings of Euclidean space, especially quasicrystalline tilings that have been constructed using a ‘supertile method’. Because tiling dynamics parallels one-dimensional symbolic dynamics, we discuss this case as well, highlighting the differences and similarities in the methods of study and the results that can be obtained.
In the first lecture we motivate the field with the discovery of quasicrystals, which led to D. Schectman’s winning the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Then we set up the basics of tiling dynamics, describing tiling spaces, a tiling metric, and the shift or translation actions. Shift-invariant and ergodic measures are discussed, along with fundamental topological and dynamical properties.
The second lecture brings in the supertile construction methods, including symbolic substitutions, self-similar tilings, $S$-adic systems, and fusion rules. Numerous examples are given, most of which are not the “standard” examples, and we identify many commonalities and differences between these interrelated methods of construction. Then we compare and contrast dynamical results for supertile systems, highlighting those key insights that can be adapted to all cases.
In the third lecture we investigate one of the many current tiling research areas: spectral theory. Schectman made his Nobel-prize-winning discovery using diffraction analysis, and studying the mathematical version has been quite fruitful. Spectral theory of tiling dynamical systems is also of broad interest. We describe how these types of spectral analysis are carried out, give examples, and discuss what is known and unknown about the relationship between dynamical and diffraction analysis. Special attention is paid to the “point spectrum”, which is related to eigenfunctions and also to the bright spots that appear on diffraction images.
These lectures introduce the dynamical systems approach to tilings of Euclidean space, especially quasicrystalline tilings that have been constructed using a ‘supertile method’. Because tiling dynamics parallels one-dimensional symbolic dynamics, we discuss this case as well, highlighting the differences and similarities in the methods of study and the results that can be obtained.
In the first lecture we motivate the field with the discovery of ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 52C23

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