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Documents  37B10 | enregistrements trouvés : 17

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We will consider (sub)shifts with complexity such that the difference from $n$ to $n+1$ is constant for all large $n$. The shifts that arise naturally from interval exchange transformations belong to this class. An interval exchange transformation on d intervals has at most $d/2$ ergodic probability measures. We look to establish the correct bound for shifts with constant complexity growth. To this end, we give our current bound and discuss further improvements when more assumptions are allowed. This is ongoing work with Michael Damron.
We will consider (sub)shifts with complexity such that the difference from $n$ to $n+1$ is constant for all large $n$. The shifts that arise naturally from interval exchange transformations belong to this class. An interval exchange transformation on d intervals has at most $d/2$ ergodic probability measures. We look to establish the correct bound for shifts with constant complexity growth. To this end, we give our current bound and discuss ...

37B10 ; 37A25 ; 68R15

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I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, and iceberg model.
I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, and iceberg model.
I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, and iceberg model.
I will speak about multidimensional shifts of finite type and their measures of maximal entropy. In particular, I will present results about computability of topological entropy for SFTs and measure-theoretic entropy. I'll focus on various mixing hypotheses, both topological and measure-theoretic, which imply different rates of computability for these objects, and give applications to various systems, including the hard square model, k-coloring, ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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These lectures introduce the dynamical systems approach to tilings of Euclidean space, especially quasicrystalline tilings that have been constructed using a ‘supertile method’. Because tiling dynamics parallels one-dimensional symbolic dynamics, we discuss this case as well, highlighting the differences and similarities in the methods of study and the results that can be obtained.
In the first lecture we motivate the field with the discovery of quasicrystals, which led to D. Schectman’s winning the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Then we set up the basics of tiling dynamics, describing tiling spaces, a tiling metric, and the shift or translation actions. Shift-invariant and ergodic measures are discussed, along with fundamental topological and dynamical properties.
The second lecture brings in the supertile construction methods, including symbolic substitutions, self-similar tilings, $S$-adic systems, and fusion rules. Numerous examples are given, most of which are not the “standard” examples, and we identify many commonalities and differences between these interrelated methods of construction. Then we compare and contrast dynamical results for supertile systems, highlighting those key insights that can be adapted to all cases.
In the third lecture we investigate one of the many current tiling research areas: spectral theory. Schectman made his Nobel-prize-winning discovery using diffraction analysis, and studying the mathematical version has been quite fruitful. Spectral theory of tiling dynamical systems is also of broad interest. We describe how these types of spectral analysis are carried out, give examples, and discuss what is known and unknown about the relationship between dynamical and diffraction analysis. Special attention is paid to the “point spectrum”, which is related to eigenfunctions and also to the bright spots that appear on diffraction images.
These lectures introduce the dynamical systems approach to tilings of Euclidean space, especially quasicrystalline tilings that have been constructed using a ‘supertile method’. Because tiling dynamics parallels one-dimensional symbolic dynamics, we discuss this case as well, highlighting the differences and similarities in the methods of study and the results that can be obtained.
In the first lecture we motivate the field with the discovery of ...

37B50 ; 37B10 ; 52C23

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An automorphism of a subshift $X$ is a self-homeomorphism of $X$ that commutes with the shift map. The study of these automorphisms started at the very beginning of the symbolic dynamics. For instance, the well known Curtis-Hedlund-Lyndon theorem asserts that each automorphism is a cellular automaton. The set of automorphisms forms a countable group that may be very complicated for mixing shift of finite type (SFT). The study of this group for low complexity subshifts has become very active in the last five years. Actually, for zero entropy subshift, this group is much more tame than in the SFT case. In a first lecture we will recall some striking property of this group for subshift of finite type. The second lecture is devoted to the description of this group for classical minimal sub shifts of zero entropy with sublinear complexity and for the family of Toeplitz subshifts. The last lecture concerns the algebraic properties of the automorphism group for subshifts with sub-exponential complexity. We will also explain why sonic group like the Baumslag-Solitar $BS(1,n)$ or $SL(d,Z), d >2$, can not embed into an automorphism group of a zero entropy subshift.
An automorphism of a subshift $X$ is a self-homeomorphism of $X$ that commutes with the shift map. The study of these automorphisms started at the very beginning of the symbolic dynamics. For instance, the well known Curtis-Hedlund-Lyndon theorem asserts that each automorphism is a cellular automaton. The set of automorphisms forms a countable group that may be very complicated for mixing shift of finite type (SFT). The study of this group for ...

37B10 ; 37B50 ; 37B15 ; 68Q80

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Multi angle  Amenable groups - Lecture 2
Bartholdi, Laurent (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

I shall discuss old and new results on amenability of groups, and more generally G-sets. This notion traces back to von Neumann in his study of the Hausdorff-Banach-Tarski paradox, and grew into one of the fundamental properties a group may / may not have -- each time with important consequences.
Lecture 1. I will present the classical notions and equivalent definitions of amenability, with emphasis on group actions and on combinatorial aspects: Means, Folner sets, random walks, and paradoxical decompositions.
Lecture 2. I will describe recent work by de la Salle et al. leading to a quite general criterion for amenability, as well as some still open problems. In particular, I will show that full topological groups of minimal Z-shifts are amenable.
Lecture 3. I will explain links between amenability and cellular automata, in particular the "Garden of Eden" properties by Moore and Myhill: there is a characterization of amenable groups in terms of whether these classical theorems still hold.
I shall discuss old and new results on amenability of groups, and more generally G-sets. This notion traces back to von Neumann in his study of the Hausdorff-Banach-Tarski paradox, and grew into one of the fundamental properties a group may / may not have -- each time with important consequences.
Lecture 1. I will present the classical notions and equivalent definitions of amenability, with emphasis on group actions and on combinatorial aspects: ...

37B15 ; 37B10 ; 43A07 ; 68Q80

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I will survey recent results on the generic properties of probability measures invariant by the geodesic flow defined on a nonpositively curved manifold. Such a flow is one of the early example of a non-uniformly hyperbolic system. I will talk about ergodicity and mixing both in the compact and noncompact setting, and ask some questions about the associated frame flow, which is partially hyperbolic.

37B10 ; 37D40 ; 34C28 ; 37C20 ; 37C40 ; 37D35

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Based on work done by Morse and Hedlund (1940) it was observed by Arnoux and Rauzy (1991) that the classical continued fraction algorithm provides a surprising link between arithmetic and diophantine properties of an irrational number $\alpha$, the rotation by $\alpha$ on the torus $\mathbb{T} = \mathbb{R}/\mathbb{Z}$, and combinatorial properties of the well known Sturmian sequences, a class of sequences on two letters with low subword complexity.
It has been conjectured since the early 1990ies that this correspondence carries over to generalized continued fraction algorithms, rotations on higher dimensional tori, and so-called $S$-adic sequences generated by substitutions. The idea of working towards this generalization is known as Rauzy’s program. Although, starting with Rauzy (1982) a number of examples for such a generalization was devised, Cassaigne, Ferenczi, and Zamboni (2000) came up with a counterexample that showed the limitations of such a generalization.
Nevertheless, recently Berthé, Steiner, and Thuswaldner (2016) made some further progress on Rauzy’s program and were able to set up a generalization of the above correspondences. They proved that the above conjecture is true under certain natural conditions. A prominent role in this generalization is played by tilings induced by generalizations of the classical Rauzy fractal introduced by Rauzy (1982).
Another idea which is related to the above results goes back to Artin (1924), who observed that the classical continued fraction algorithm and its natural extension can be viewed as a Poincaré section of the geodesic flow on the space $SL_2(\mathbb{Z}) \ SL_2(\mathbb{R})$. Arnoux and Fisher (2001) revisited Artin’s idea and showed that the above mentioned correspondence between continued fractions, rotations, and Sturmian sequences can be interpreted in a very nice way in terms of an extension of this geodesic flow which they called the scenery flow. Currently, Arnoux et al. are setting up elements of a generalization of this connection as well.
It is the aim of my series of lectures to review the above results.
Based on work done by Morse and Hedlund (1940) it was observed by Arnoux and Rauzy (1991) that the classical continued fraction algorithm provides a surprising link between arithmetic and diophantine properties of an irrational number $\alpha$, the rotation by $\alpha$ on the torus $\mathbb{T} = \mathbb{R}/\mathbb{Z}$, and combinatorial properties of the well known Sturmian sequences, a class of sequences on two letters with low subword ...

11B83 ; 11K50 ; 37B10 ; 52C23 ; 53D25

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Given $x\in(0, 1]$, let ${\mathcal U}(x)$ be the set of bases $\beta\in(1,2]$ for which there exists a unique sequence $(d_i)$ of zeros and ones such that $x=\sum_{i=1}^{\infty}{{d_i}/{\beta^i}}$. In 2014, Lü, Tan and Wu proved that ${\mathcal U}(x)$ is a Lebesgue null set of full Hausdorff dimension. In this talk, we will show that the algebraic sum ${\mathcal U}(x)+\lambda {\mathcal U}(x)$, and the product ${\mathcal U}(x)\cdot {\mathcal U}(x)^{\lambda}$ contain an interval for all $x\in (0, 1]$ and $\lambda\ne 0$. As an application we show that the same phenomenon occurs for the set of non-matching parameters associated with the family of symmetric binary expansions studied recently by the first speaker and C. Kalle.
This is joint work with V. Komornik, D. Kong and W. Li.
Given $x\in(0, 1]$, let ${\mathcal U}(x)$ be the set of bases $\beta\in(1,2]$ for which there exists a unique sequence $(d_i)$ of zeros and ones such that $x=\sum_{i=1}^{\infty}{{d_i}/{\beta^i}}$. In 2014, Lü, Tan and Wu proved that ${\mathcal U}(x)$ is a Lebesgue null set of full Hausdorff dimension. In this talk, we will show that the algebraic sum ${\mathcal U}(x)+\lambda {\mathcal U}(x)$, and the product ${\mathcal U}(x)\cdot {\mathcal ...

28A80 ; 11A63 ; 37B10

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In the way of Arnoux-Ito, we give a general geometric criterion for a subshift to be measurably conjugated to a domain exchange and to a translation on a torus. For a subshift coming from an unit Pisot irreducible substitution, we will see that it becomes a simple topological criterion. More precisely, we define a topology on $\mathbb{Z}^d$ for which the subshift has pure discrete spectrum if and only if there exists a domain of the domain exchange on the discrete line that has non-empty interior. We will see how we can compute exactly such interior using regular languages. This gives a way to decide the Pisot conjecture for any example of unit Pisot irreducible substitution.
Joint work with Shigeki Akiyama.
In the way of Arnoux-Ito, we give a general geometric criterion for a subshift to be measurably conjugated to a domain exchange and to a translation on a torus. For a subshift coming from an unit Pisot irreducible substitution, we will see that it becomes a simple topological criterion. More precisely, we define a topology on $\mathbb{Z}^d$ for which the subshift has pure discrete spectrum if and only if there exists a domain of the domain ...

37B10 ; 28A80 ; 11A63 ; 68R15

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Dimension groups are invariants of orbital equivalence. We show in this lecture how to compute the dimension group of tree subshifts. Tree subshifts are defined in terms of extension graphs that describe the left and right extensions of factors of their languages: the extension graphs are trees. This class of subshifts includes classical families such as Sturmian, Arnoux-Rauzy subshifts, or else, codings of interval exchanges. We rely on return word properties for tree subshifts: every finite word in the language of a tree word admits exactly d return words, where d is the cardinality of the alphabet.
This is joint work with P. Cecchi, F. Dolce, F. Durand, J. Leroy, D. Perrin, S. Petite.
Dimension groups are invariants of orbital equivalence. We show in this lecture how to compute the dimension group of tree subshifts. Tree subshifts are defined in terms of extension graphs that describe the left and right extensions of factors of their languages: the extension graphs are trees. This class of subshifts includes classical families such as Sturmian, Arnoux-Rauzy subshifts, or else, codings of interval exchanges. We rely on return ...

37A20 ; 37B10 ; 68R15 ; 68Q45

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Rufus Bowen introduced the specification property for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems and used it to establish uniqueness of equilibrium states, including the measure of maximal entropy. After reviewing Bowen's argument, we will present our recent work on extending Bowen's approach to non-uniformly hyperbolic systems. We will describe the general result, which makes precise the notion of "entropy (orpressure) of obstructions to specification" using a decomposition of the space of finite-length orbit segments, and then survey various applications, including factors of beta-shifts, derived-from-Anosov diffeomorphisms, and geodesic flows in non-positive curvature and beyond.
Rufus Bowen introduced the specification property for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems and used it to establish uniqueness of equilibrium states, including the measure of maximal entropy. After reviewing Bowen's argument, we will present our recent work on extending Bowen's approach to non-uniformly hyperbolic systems. We will describe the general result, which makes precise the notion of "entropy (orpressure) of obstructions to s...

37D35 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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Rufus Bowen introduced the specification property for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems and used it to establish uniqueness of equilibrium states, including the measure of maximal entropy. After reviewing Bowen's argument, we will present our recent work on extending Bowen's approach to non-uniformly hyperbolic systems. We will describe the general result, which makes precise the notion of "entropy (orpressure) of obstructions to specification" using a decomposition of the space of finite-length orbit segments, and then survey various applications, including factors of beta-shifts, derived-from-Anosov diffeomorphisms, and geodesic flows in non-positive curvature and beyond.
Rufus Bowen introduced the specification property for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems and used it to establish uniqueness of equilibrium states, including the measure of maximal entropy. After reviewing Bowen's argument, we will present our recent work on extending Bowen's approach to non-uniformly hyperbolic systems. We will describe the general result, which makes precise the notion of "entropy (orpressure) of obstructions to s...

37D35 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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Rufus Bowen introduced the specification property for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems and used it to establish uniqueness of equilibrium states, including the measure of maximal entropy. After reviewing Bowen's argument, we will present our recent work on extending Bowen's approach to non-uniformly hyperbolic systems. We will describe the general result, which makes precise the notion of "entropy (orpressure) of obstructions to specification" using a decomposition of the space of finite-length orbit segments, and then survey various applications, including factors of beta-shifts, derived-from-Anosov diffeomorphisms, and geodesic flows in non-positive curvature and beyond.
Rufus Bowen introduced the specification property for uniformly hyperbolic dynamical systems and used it to establish uniqueness of equilibrium states, including the measure of maximal entropy. After reviewing Bowen's argument, we will present our recent work on extending Bowen's approach to non-uniformly hyperbolic systems. We will describe the general result, which makes precise the notion of "entropy (orpressure) of obstructions to s...

37D35 ; 37B10 ; 37B40

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Multi angle  Symbolic bounded remainder sets
Berthé, Valérie (Auteur de la Conférence) | CIRM (Editeur )

Discrepancy is a measure of equidistribution for sequences of points. We consider here discrepancy in the setting of symbolic dynamics and we discuss the existence of bounded remainder sets for some families of zero entropy subshifts, from a topological dynamics viewpoint. A bounded remainder set is a set which yields bounded discrepancy, that is, the number of times it is visited differs by the expected time only by a constant. Bounded discrepancy provides particularly strong convergence properties of ergodic sums. It is also closely related to the notions of balance in word combinatorics.
Discrepancy is a measure of equidistribution for sequences of points. We consider here discrepancy in the setting of symbolic dynamics and we discuss the existence of bounded remainder sets for some families of zero entropy subshifts, from a topological dynamics viewpoint. A bounded remainder set is a set which yields bounded discrepancy, that is, the number of times it is visited differs by the expected time only by a constant. Bounded ...

37B10 ; 11K50 ; 37A30 ; 28A80 ; 11J70 ; 11K38

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